Yours Tru.ly presents Pillow Talk/Pillow Fight 2 (Unofficial CMJ Party) – Tickets – Glasslands Gallery – Brooklyn, NY – October 21st, 2011

Yours Tru.ly presents Pillow Talk/Pillow Fight 2 (Unofficial CMJ Party)

Yours Tru.ly presents Pillow Talk/Pillow Fight 2 (Unofficial CMJ Party)

Active Child, Born Gold, The Stepkids, Araabmuzik, Memoryhouse, Caveman, INC, Ava Luna

Fri, October 21, 2011

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Glasslands Gallery

Brooklyn, NY

Free

This event is 21 and over

Active Child
Active Child
For Pat Grossi of Active Child, the last two years have been nothing short of enriching. Musically, Pat has worked within and appropriated a number of styles into his sound, from his early days singing with that heavenly voice as a choir boy to his more recent forays into laptop-assisted indie-pop made in his bedroom, best exemplified on 2010’s acclaimed Curtis Lane EP. His sound is so wide-ranging that he has found himself touring with many notable acts of differing genres, including dubstep producer James Blake, dreamy synth-pop of School of Seven Bells, and the indie-rock bands White Lies and White Rabbits.
Born Gold
Born Gold
Born Gold, the lads formerly known as Gobble Gobble are hard, up against it and reaching heavenwards in a desperate bid for your adoration. "Decimate Everything" as the title for a lead track is a bit of dangerous hyperbole for this offering which falls in, or forms, the epicenter of electronic's newest genre: electro-fuzzyjoypop. Accompanying such bold phrasing, one expects hulking bass ignorant of what it steps on, coruscating power cords which peel back ones cerebral cortex and corrupting vocals which inform on how to lay waste to all organic life on Earth in three easy steps. Not here, no. If you armed Al Jorgensen with a feather… or both members of Erasure with jackhammers they could do more damage in a china shop than these canucks. Admittedly "Decimate Everything" comes out of the gate with a bit of heat, it surrenders it all, and quickly, to a pastoral gallop where cheeky handclaps abound and heels are clicked with in a confetti tsunami—"Decimate All Dirt and Clean Everything Really, Really Well" may be a more apt tag. As for the rest of the LP, promises are made, ever-lasting fealty sworn, friendships consummated. That being said, if you like ebullient music and phrases that rhyme, you're in for a treat. Fan of the Pet Shop Boys? Bronski Beat? ABC? Soft Cell, Erasure or Vince Clarke in general? Form a line, do it with joyous abandon—they're based in San Fran so you needn't pack a bag! - Magnetic Mag
The Stepkids
The Stepkids
RIYL: Sly Stone, Fifth Dimension, Stereolab and Beulah


"The Stepkids... (offer) up an impressive album of expansive psychedelic soul with a hazy sound comprised of blunted funk and R&B rhythms, atmospheric organ, trippy guitar textures, shivering synthetic strings, occasional sax, airy harmonies and some gorgeous falsetto." - KEXP

"This cosmic Connecticut trio are spiritual heirs to an era when funk was far-out and soul went psychedelic." - The Guardian
Araabmuzik
Araabmuzik
If you were to Google the name Araabmuzik, you would discover a lot video's showing this music producer hammering on an MPC as if he was Travis Barker on the drums. With his fast rhythmic touches on the machine - while donning a New Era fitted, some might call it poetry in motion, others might say it's suicide on an MPC, but for the Dipset in-house producer it's just another day on the job.

Born Abraham Orellana in Providence, RI, the middle child of two other siblings, he grew up with an affection to music starting at a very young age. "I've been drumming since the age of 3. When I was around 10, I started getting into keyboard and producing my own music." Half Dominican and Guatemalan, he confesses that his Hispanic heritage has influenced his music to a degree. With his mom being a one-time professional singer he's been around melodies and beats his entire life, however; growing up in Providence... it's natural to assume Hip-Hop not having much of an influence in the city, considering that's it sprawled so far away in New England. "There's definitely a lot of Hip-Hop here. You'll find a lot of local rap groups, solo artists out here that are trying make it, it's just the fact that we're not on the map like that just yet." Having found much success working with Dipset members Cam'Ron, Duke Da God, Hell Rell and others, he's also shopped beats to Young Jeezy, Ludacris, Cassidy, Gucci Man, Young Dro and Fabolous. With his rapid beat making techniques, it's easy to understand why it's getting him on shows from state to state because it's amazing to see. "I've been getting booked by clubs lately to do shows performing on my MPC live. It's something different, unique and it puts me in a position to be a trendsetter, but on the other hand - it's allowing other producers in the crowd to hear my sound and see what I'm doing, but I don't think you can really duplicate what I'm doing." Putting a name on how to define his music and style is a daunting task, but under the fabric of his beats still lies a blueprint from the influences of Dr. Dre, Swizz Beats, Pete Rock, 9th Wonder, Hi-Tek, DJ Khalil and Beatmakers. These famous producers vicariously helped in perfecting his craft to the point now that it's a full time job. "When I first started making beats, I went from the keyboard to a software program and to an MPC. My motivation at that time was just for the fact that I wanted to hear and make my own music. All my old beats on the keyboard where like a good 3-4 minutes long and as I got better, so did the beats." Not really needing much for motivation when making a new beats is natural. "I'm not the type that needs to smoke a blunt or have a drink to be creative. "I just sit down and think of what I'm going to do or how I'm going to do it. It doesn't take long - no more than ten minutes for me to complete a beat. It's always like 10-15 minutes the most and then I'm done."

As his talents continue to move him forward, don't ever think leaving his hometown is in the plans. "Growing up in Providence, I was blessed because I didn't have to go through a lot of the things that other people that I know in places like Boston and New York had to go through. I was raised by both my mom and my pops and their still together this day. Besides, it doesn't matter where I'm from just so long as the people keep liking my beats that's all that matters."
Memoryhouse
Memoryhouse
Amidst a haze of sepia-tinged delirium, the swirling reverb-cloaked concoctions of Toronto, Canada’s Memoryhouse exist to soundtrack the indelible moments residing in the obscure backrooms of memory. Translating songwriter Evan Abeele’s experience with classical modes and modern ambient composition, Memoryhouse create vivid depictions of surrealist beauty, unfolding with crystalline clarity and with a gentle vulnerability both lush and subtle. Accompanied by singer Denise Nouvion’s tender, nostalgic vocal delivery, Memoryhouse renders the blending of the contemporary with the forgotten, the traditional and the technological, the visual and the aural, forged within the sonographic landscapes of ‘dream pop’.

With the release of their debut E.P. The Years as a free download in January 2010, Memoryhouse garnered attention from notable indie music institutions such as Pitchfork Media and Gorilla vs. Bear, as well as receiving high acclaim from international magazines such as France’s Magic RPM. Their forthcoming release Looms of Youth on Arcade Sound LTD will not only refine the dreamy aesthetics introduced on The Years, but will explore new and exciting territory aided by their unique microscopic focus on sound and texture.
Caveman
Caveman
Caveman-a five-man vibe collective from NYC-released their first album in 2011. As first albums go, CoCo Beware was something akin to a moody statement of intent, a blueprint for a band quickly learning how to create horizon-wide rock songs that were equal parts intimate and expansive. Initially self-released and later snatched up by Fat Possum for re-release in early 2012, the record brims over with four-part harmonies, crystalline guitar lines, and tracks that see-sawed between echoey lullaby ("A Country's King of Dreams") to shoegaze-by-way-of classic-FM-radio sprawl ("Old Friend"). The album quickly elevated Caveman from local band to watch to a sizable touring draw and formidable live act, as evidenced by stints on the road with the likes of The War on Drugs and Built to Spill. Despite being the work of a brand new band, CoCo Beware displayed a kind of Zen-like ease. It was the sound a five friends settling into a nice groove; the music that happens when, for whatever reason, a lot of seemingly disparate elements finally fall into place.
On their self-titled sophomore album Caveman stretch their legs in a number of different, albeit cohesive, directions. While the dreaded second album experience tends to be fraught for many bands, in the case of Caveman it proved to be the opposite. Having ridden a fast-growing wave of support for CoCo Beware-which, after two years of touring, ultimately culminated in a series of big hometown NYC shows-recording a follow up proved to be a genuine good time for the band.
"We all went up to Jimmy's grandmother's place in New Hampshire," says singer Matthew Iwanusa. "That's where the new record kind of started. It was literally the attic of her barn, lit up by Christmas lights. We'd all sit in this one room together and one by one we'd all go into the bathroom and record ourselves making the most psycho noises possible. It actually felt kind of like a weird breakthrough. We were all confident and comfortable enough with each other to try out these experiments, which extended itself into the making of the new record...which is really just an evolution of this vibe that we'd been cultivating for long time."
With that, the guys holed up in Brooklyn's Rumpus Room to start recording in earnest with Nick Stumpf (who produced the band's debut album) and Albert Di Fiore behind the controls. They routinely turned out all the lights in the studio and "vibed out the space" while recording, which makes sense given the warm, big room feeling that saturates the record. The album is a kind of sonic microcosm-a series of emotional yet tough mini-narratives operating within the same quixotic musical universe.
It's fair to say that the songs on Caveman benefited from a solid year of touring on the band's part. "We really learned how to play together," says keyboardist Sam Hopkins, "the shorter songs from the first record got longer and longer when we played them live. We learned how to stretch ourselves in different ways." As a result, the guitars on Caveman are bigger and more expansive, the rhythm section is tighter and more adventurous, the keyboards more opaque and pronounced. Like a marriage between Tangerine Dream, late period Slowdive, and Lindsey Buckingham, tracks like their new single "In the City" and "Ankles" boast synth lines that sound simultaneously retro and futuristic, while "Pricey" and "Never Want to Know" overflow with guitar sounds that could have miraculously floated off an old Cure album. (It should be noted that James Carbonetti, the band's primary guitar player, also happens to be one of the most highly regarded guitar makers in New York City.) And while Caveman's music could certainly operate on the level of dreamy soundscape and still be excellent, the depth of feeling in front man Matthew Iwanusa's lyrics helps weave the songs deeply into your memory. As is the case with many a band on the rise, the price of popularity often comes at the surprise expense of everyone's own personal life; a topic that fuels many of the record's best tracks. When Iwanusa sings Where's the time to waste on someone else's life? on "Where's the Time" it's hard not to read between the lines. Wonder and regret seem to fuel the record in almost equal measure.
"We all got so close since the making of the last record," explains Carbonetti, "Eventually it was like all of our lives were kind of blending together and several of us found ourselves going through the same kinds of struggles in our personal lives. We also realized that we all kind of loved each other-that we'd passed the friend test-and that we all just wanted to hang out together all the time, basically. All of those feelings eventually bled into the record we ended up making."
The words "dreamy" and "cinematic" and "vibe" might be some of the most lazily overused descriptors in the music-writers lexicon, but it's hard to think of another contemporary band that so completely embraces those terms as both an adjective for what they do and as a goal for the art they are trying to make. "A lot people don't relate to the idea of cinematic music-something that sounds like a film soundtrack-but I love that notion," says Iwanusa. "I love music that conjures a mood, sets a tone, and inspires a certain kind of visual. I hope people can get that from this record: a sound that accompanies this big ship flying through the trees, this big, crazy light that just fills up the sky."
Ava Luna
Ava Luna
With the release of the critically lauded Services EP in early 2010
and a near-constant stream of shows and short tours over the
successive months, NYC natives Ava Luna have built a reputation for
noisy, manic basement soul music in the form of stark, earthy
synth-driven beats coupled with tight, prismatic vocal harmonies,
which Christopher Weingarten has described as “beautiful, infectious,
and damn-near indescribable.”

In a church basement in Brooklyn’s deep south, they hone an eclectic
mashup of girl group harmonies, growling synth-funk, shimmering
distortion, soul stylings set to post-punk snobbery, complex
compositions in the guise of quirky pop songs; Al Green singing with
Wire, Depeche Mode backing Jamie Lidell. The band has drawn
comparisons to TV on the Radio, Dirty Projectors, Prince, Arab on
Radar, Phillip Glass, James Chance, Aphex Twin....
Venue Information:
Glasslands Gallery
289 Kent Avenue
Brooklyn, NY, 11249
http://www.theglasslands.com/