Soon-To-Be Innocent Fun, Com Truise – Tickets – Glasslands Gallery – Brooklyn, NY – February 22nd, 2013

Soon-To-Be Innocent Fun, Com Truise

Soon-To-Be Innocent Fun

Com Truise

Beacon, Nitemoves, Heathered Pearls (DJ Set)

Fri, February 22, 2013

Doors: 11:30 pm / Show: 11:30 pm

Glasslands Gallery

Brooklyn, NY

$15.00

Sold Out

This event is 21 and over

Com Truise
Com Truise
Wave 1 is the first new transmission the world has received from producer Seth Haley since his gloriously futuristic debut album Galactic Melt. That album cataloged the genesis and evolution of Haley’s alter ego Com Truise — the world’s first synthetic/robotic astronaut, as Haley described him — and this EP continues the character’s journey into the outer reaches of the musical multiverse. In the process, it also builds on Haley’s signature production style, one that’s rooted in classic sci-fi sounds and analogue textures but nevertheless manages to sound utterly contemporary.

The EP takes its name from the newly discovered galaxy to which the intrepid astronaut’s voyages take him, and there certainly seems to be a narrative structure to its sequencing. Opening track “Wasat” sets the scene, providing a brief, atmospheric prelude that quickly settles into an uptempo, hypercolor groove. “Mind” is an exercise in dramatic tension, its beats constantly threatening to explode into a full-fledged four-to-the-floor stomp, but never quite doing so. “Declination,” which features guest vocals from Joel Ford (Airbird, Ejecta, Ford & Lopatin), glides into your headphones like a starship slipping down out of hyperspace — it’s the EP’s most melodic moment, and perhaps the most straightforwardly melodic tune in the Com Truise oeuvre to date.

“Subsonic” is full of dramatic grandeur, marking the moment at which the EP’s initial rush of energy subsides into the sort of dramatic, slow-building textures that should really be soundtracking the birth of new stars. The track evolves through several movements, and is full of evocative electronic textures (along with one hell of a squelchy bass sound). “Valis Called (Control)” maintains the reflective mood, while “Meserere Mei” is all fractured beats and jagged textures. The title track brings the record to a close with an air of serenity, the melody line drifting away into the distance on washes of sci-fi synth sounds.

Haley described Galactic Melt as a “sort of film score…from the mind,” and Wave 1 works the same way, evoking the latest stage in the intergalactic journey of Com Truise — and leaving you wondering what corner of the cosmos he’ll visit next.
Beacon
Beacon
Thomas Mullarney and Jacob Gossett, aka Brooklyn duo Beacon, introduced themselves to the world with the No Body and For Now EPs, both released last year on Ghostly International. The EPs were united by minimalist, R&B-influenced instrumentation, and also by a lyrical theme, with both serving as meditations on the darkness that underpins the most intense of human emotions: love.
The duo's debut album The Ways We Separate both consolidates and develops these ideas. The album focuses, as the title suggests, on the idea of separation — both within the context of relationships and in a more intimate, psychological sense. As Mullarney explains, "The narrative contained inside The Ways We Separate deals with two kinds of separation: one where two entities grow apart, and the other where we grow apart from ourselves. Over the course of a relationship, the two sometimes happen together, one being the result of the other."

Desires, passions and regrets are central to the songs on The Ways We Separate, which take a variety of perspectives to construct a nuanced reflection on the album's central theme. 'Between the Waves' draws a clever analogy between relationships and soundwaves falling out of phase: "I know all the ways we separate/ Where we start to fade at different frequencies." 'Overseer' catalogues a parting of the ways with discomfiting clarity: "Isn't it fine?/ Taking it slow?/ Watching you watch me walk out your door." And album closer 'Split in Two' explores how th extremes of love and loss can take you far away from being the person you thought you were, making explicit the connection between the two ideas of separation: "What I'd do for you?", sings Thomas Mullarney, "Split myself in half/ Divided into two."

Musically, The Ways We Separate finds Beacon working with a richer sonic palette than ever before —as Gossett says, "The production on this album is much more expansive than anything we’ve done thus far. We spent a lot of time exploring new gear and experimenting with how to pull a wide range of sound out of various instruments. Some of the key sonics that shaped this LP are analogue synthesis, lots of heavily processed guitar work, and vocal layering/processing." While the abiding mood remains that of late-night introspection, the production draws from elements of hip hop and a wide gamut of electronic music, marrying intricate beats and subtle textures to honeyed pop melodies that belie the album's conceptual depth. Rarely has bleakness sounded so pretty — this is a record that's deceptively, compellingly beautiful, an exploration of a place both discomfiting and darkly seductive.
Nitemoves
Nitemoves is the electronic guise and internet handle of musician/sound designer Rory O'Connor. While supporting other electronic artists as a drummer (Tycho, Com Truise), O'Connor quietly composed his debut release, 'Longlines', in 3-6 hour chunks occupying the back seat of a moving car.

Championing influence from Satie, Jenkinson, & Corgan, the work was composed with the whole in mind, rather than a collection of isolated microcosms. It is a conscious endeavor in variety and continuity, attempting to bridge the gap between influences that have a tendency to contradict each other.

Written amid a period of introspection and wanderlust, it reinstalls the idea of the folk musician: traveling the country while funneling inspiration from all directions in an attempt to tell a story, to paint a picture of time passing. The title itself reflects an exercise in patience, constructing populations of simple melodies and rhythms, permitting them time to grow alongside each other and form complex relationships.
Heathered Pearls (DJ Set)
• Circular repetition at low levels •
• Crystal • Marble • Halftones •
• Damaging beautiful loops •
• Color collisions •
• Slow motion •
Venue Information:
Glasslands Gallery
289 Kent Avenue
Brooklyn, NY, 11249
http://www.theglasslands.com/